Introduction to Computing in the Arts

Spring 2002
Instructor Tony Allard
antalla@cox.net
Lecture: Wednesdays 4:40 pm - 6:30 pm
Location: Center Hall 109
Office Hours: Wednesday 6:45 - 7:45 PM, VAF 408
Teaching Assistants:

COURSE OVERVIEW
Introduction to Computing in the Arts

This course will provide you with a unique opportunity to immerse yourself in the diverse and dynamic field of computing arts and cultural production. Like the field of computing arts, this course will be diverse and dynamic and seeks to provide the student with a historical, theoretical, aesthetic, and technical introduction to the challenges inherent in the merging of art, culture and computing. The lectures will be presented in hybrid form, consisting of a mix of traditional lectures and multimedia, performance-based delivery of information (at times I will lecture as my avator, The Prophet of @). These hybrid lectures will examine the history of computers and a wide array of users of computers, including, among others, artists, musicians, designers, pranksters, political activists and ordinary citizens.

The lectures are organized around primary topics of inquiry and are intended to provide a critical and aesthetic framework for considering all types of digital and electronic media. The ten lectures are divided into key theoretical concepts which underlie the use of computers in visual arts--such as human-computer interface, hypertextual narratives, hypermedia, "Culture Jamming", interactivity, artificial intelligence, artificial life, cyborgs and cyberspace. Throughout the quarter, we will view a broad range of work by artists who use the computer as a medium, as a tool, as subject matter or all of the above. Inside and outside of class you will see and interact with artwor on CD-ROM, the Web and videos as well as other cultural artifacts of the digital age, from computer console games to online chat rooms.

The lab sessions are run by the TAs. Students will learn basic skills of general computer use, Web design and computer media manipulation. Students will use these artistic and practical skills, as well as applying the knowledge acquired through the hybrid lectures, and readings, to complete creative projects. Lab sessions include technical demonstrations, independent work under TA supervision and presentations and discussions of students' work.

Week to Week Schedule Schedule & Lectures

Projects:
#1
#2
#3

CLASS REQUIREMENTS and EVALUATION
1. Art projects(3 projects) 50%
2. Final exam 25%
3. attendance/participation in discussion (in lab and on-line) 25%
A (91-100) = excellent, B (81-90) =above average, C (71-80) =average, D (61-70)=below average, F (60 & below) =unacceptable

GRADING POLICY AND GENERAL RULES
All assignments must be turned in on time at the beginning of section. Failure to complete work on due date will result in a full letter grade reduction for each subsequent class in which project is not turned in. Creative projects will be graded on the basis of original ideas, artistic form and technical skills.

Final projects must be turned in on time to receive credit. No late final projects will be accepted. There is no scheduled make-up time for the final exam. You are responsible for informing the professor of any conflict at least three weeks prior to the exam.

ATTENDANCE
Students must sign attendance sheet to lectures and lab. Arriving to class late, forgetting to sign attendance sheet or leaving early will count as an absence on the student's record. In the case of an excused absence, student will provide a written excuse or a doctor's note. Student will be allowed one unexcused absence for a lecture and one for a lab during the quarter. After this limit, each unexcused absence will automatically lower your grade one half a letter grade.

DISCLAIMER
In this class I reserve the right to show a broad range of course materials, some of which assume the audience to be adult in age and demeanor. Should you at any time in the course of the class feel offended by something you have seen or heard, we would appreciate you staying to be part of a dialogue. If you feel that you cannot stay, remove yourself from the classroom as discretely as possible. You may be asked to report on your response.

REQUIRED MATERIALS
Floppy discs and ZIP discs as required for backing up projects. Printing account with ACS.

AP&M B349 computer lab: Each registered student will also be given access to the lab for the duration of the quarter, controlled by a personal Key Code. The account information and the Key Code will be supplied by your TA. The server is regularly backed up by ACS.

Computer accounts: Each student registered for the class will receive a UNIX computer account on sgva-serv1 UNIX server. The account information will be supplied by your TA. Storing your work: During working session, store your files on the hard drive of your NT computer. When you finished working for the day, move your files to your account on sgva-serv1 UNIX server.

Class Resource page

REQUIRED TEXT
Interface Culture by Stephen Johnson (available at Groundworks and also on Amazon.com)

ON-LINE readings through hyperlinks on syllabus (below)

ON-LINE JOURNALS & LISTSERVES TO SUBSCRIBE TO OR SURF
Rhizome
Zonezero
Ctheory
Hotwired


RECOMMENDED Art Sites/Online Exhibitions
Adaweb
hotwired RGB gallery
the Remedi Project
Beyond Interface
shockoftheview
Through the looking glass
Art Entertainment Network
PaperVeins
Digibodies
Gamasutra
Shimon Attie


NET ANIMATION AND DESIGN
SuperBad
SiteSakamoto
Eric Loyer, Lair of the Marrow Monkey
PotatoLand
Praystation
Sodaplay
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