VSAR_422 Art_and_Technology_of_the_Moving_Image____________________________________________

Part I
  1 2 3 4 5 6        An Introduction to the history of the moving image and models of visuality
Part II  
7 8 9 10 11      The Politics of the Moving Image
Part III 12 13       Electronic Bodies and the Prosthetics of the new moving image 

Presentations 14 15 16
Assignments

_______________________________________________________________________________________

Part I

An Introduction to the history of the moving image and models of visuality

 

Week 1

January 26
Introduction to the class, syllabus, grading, attendance, readings, assignments

--Intro to the themes of the class: politics and poetics; from spectator to participant.

 

Early history of the moving image and models visuality at the turn of the century
First, we will examine the technological and cultural innovations during the Industrial Revolution at the turn of the century that contributed to the development of the moving image. Then, we will take a look at early moving image devices used from the 18th century to the turn of the century, including among others: the camera obscura, zootrope, stereoscopes, peepshows. We will then take a look at the major leap foreword of the moving image with the invention of cinema. Once we have technical history to reference, we will then look at various models of visuality that took shape at the turn of the century and the development of the first wave of globalization of visual cultures through mass media. And finally, we will examine, through a series of performative, hands-on excersizes the phenomenon of "socialized vision"--how our vision becomes socialized through a variety of visual habits which are imposed on our vision by the culture we live in. We will also have a discussion on how these visual habits have become partof the language of the moving image.

 

Screenings:
Images relating to Lecture 1

Precursors to Cinema, mechanical moving images

Images relating to socialized vision

Early films:

"The Cinema Begins, II
The Lumière Brothers' first films [videorecording] VTC 2546
Films of George Méliès. Volume #1 VTC 3107

Edison "Electrocuting an Elephant"

Note: the screening list for each class will change so take notice of updates to the website.

Assignment 1: Socialized Vision, visual habits, framing through the Oculus,
Due: Week 2. Be prepared to discuss your observations in class.
On an 8 1/2 X 11 piece of white cardboard, cut an oculus in the middle of the page that is a horizontal rectangle two inches wide and one and a half inches high. The proportions should be roughly the same as that of a conventional television set, the 4:3 ratio, horizontal rectangle. During the coming week take your oculus with you where ever you go and use it to frame your view. As you are framing and composing these "shots" be looking for specific examples of socialized vision and the visual habits (discussed in class) you come across at home and in public spaces.Take particular notice of the site/context where you observe these examples of socialized vision. Write down you observations and hand in to me next week a one to two page paper and also be prepared to discuss your observations in class. You will use this oculus throughout the semester so bring it to every class.

Brief Introduction of next week's visiting artist, Sam Chen
Sam Chen, Visiting filmmaker. http://www.eternalgaze.com
Mr. Chen will screen the "The Eternal Gaze", his award winning animation. Mr. Chen will be a visiting filmmaker in residence at Cal State during February. If you are interested in attending his free animation workshops for all students, contact Professor Kristine Diekman via e-mail at: kdiekman@csusm.edu

 

Required reading due for discussion:

In preporation for visiting artist, Sam Chen, please visit these two websites:
History of Animation:
http://animation.filmtv.ucla.edu/program/anihist.html
History of Computer Animation:
http://www-2.cs.cmu.edu/afs/cs/usr/ph/www/nyit/morrison


Week 2

February 2
Sam Chen, Visiting filmmaker. http://www.eternalgaze.com
Mr. Chen will screen the "The Eternal Gaze", his award winning animation. Mr. Chen will be a visiting filmmaker in residence at Cal State during February. If you are interested in attending his free animation workshops for all students, contact Professor Kristine Diekman via e-mail at: kdiekman@csusm.edu

Assignment 2: Review of Sam Chen's presentation. Due week 4, Feb 19
For the second assignment you will write a 700 word review (the typical length of an art review in a free newspaper, i.e., the Reader) of Sam Chen's presentation. As you write the review, refer to specific points I made in last week's presentation regarding the origins of the moving image and the first, second and third waves of globalization. Your review should NOT be a series of sentences describing what you like, but rather, should be a critical analysis of his work. I will explain in greater detail in class today.

 


Week 3

February 9
A history of the modern and contemporary moving image; modern and contemporary models of visuality; construction of the subject; representation; the concept of montage

We will contunue the history of the moving image by first looking at the developments of "telematic culture" at the turn of the century and also the second wave of globalization of visual culture through the development of electronic mass media. We will look at early broadcast television, the introduction of cable TV and video tape in the 1950s, video art in the late 1960s, cable television and the VCR and camcorder boom in the early 1980s. We will look at very recent transformations of the moving image by the third wave of mass media and globalization with the introduction of the the computer, the Internet, virtual reality, interactive multimedia, computer animation and digital cinema and other computer-based moving image production. We will also look at modern and contemporary models of visuality. And finally, we will conclude with a discussion of the construction of the subject, representation and the concept of montage in film. This discussion will also include your observations of examples of socialized vision you made with/through the oculus.

 

Screenings:
Annecdotes on Mediated visions

Images relating to lecture 2

Images relating to socialized vision
Early Television (video tape)

Video Art in the 1960s, 70s, 80s and 1990s:
“Velvet Water” Chris Burdon (video tape)
“Mosaic For the Kali Yuga” Daniel Reeves (video tape)
“From Here To LA” Toni la Bone (video tape)

Video: The Machine that Changed the World; Great Brains
Links
: The Machine That Changed the World: Episode I - Great Brains

Professor Lev Manovich, UCSD, "Little Movies"
Desktop Theater, Prof Adriene Jenik, UCSD

Bit Screen

"Synthetic Pleasures"

"Final Fantasy"

and others

Required reading due for discussion:

Peter Weibel. "The World as Interface: Towards the Construction of Context-Controlled Events-Worlds". Electronic Culture, Technology and Visual Representation. Ed. Timothy Druckery. Aperture, 1996. 338-351
Recommended reading:

" The Cinematographic Principle and the Ideogram:", Film Form: Essays in Film Theory, Sergei Eisenstein.

Assignment 1 due today: Socialized Vision, visual habits, framing through the Oculus
Be prepared to discuss your observations on socialized vision in the culture at large.


Week 4

February 16

The Avant Garde and Experimental Cinema--Europe and U.S.

The “Avant Garde” is a French military term originally used to describe the advancing troops at the front line of battle. It has also been used to describe artists and filmmakers who are at the advanced edge of experimentation and innovation in the arts. In this class we will look at the development of “first” and “second” cinema for mass audiences. We will look at this development in relationship to the work by early avant garde, post WWI Dada and Surrealist filmmakers in Germany and early experimental, post WWII filmmakers in the U.S. We will conclude with further discussion from last week on the construction of the subject, representation and the concept of montage in film. We will finish with a discussion of the Brakhage article and avant garde strategies for alternative story telling (narratives) and abstract film.

 

Images relating to the lecture

Part 1: Mondernism, Avant Garde movements

Part 2: Dada, Surrealism, Explanation of the Surrealist Parlor Games Exquisite Corpse

Part 3: Avant Garde Cinema up to 1964

Cinematic Representation and the Gaze

Some theoretical terms you mayt need to know

Screenings:

The Movies Begin II
Fritz Lang “Metropolis” (1926)
The films of Oskar Fischenger, "Optical Poetry"
Rene Clair “Entre Act” (1924)
Luis Buneul & Salvador Dali
“Un Chien andalou (An andalusian Dog)” (1928)
Dziga Vertov “Man With a Movie Camera”
Vittorio De Sica “The Bicycle Thief”
Francois Truffaut “The 400 Blows” (1959)
Jean-Luc Godard “Breathless” (1959)
Stan Brakhage, “Hand Painted Films” (film on video)
Jim Shedden “Brakhage” documentary

George Melies “The Magic of George Melies”

 

Required reading due for discussion:
Stan Brakhage. from "Metaphors on Vision". Film Theory and Criticism, Introductory Readings. Ed. Leo Braudy and Marshall Cohen. Oxford Press, 1999. 228-234


Assignment 2 Due: Review of Sam Chen's presentation

Week 5

February 23

Experimental Film, Video and Television: From Audience to Interactor

Recently, the viewer, spectator or audience has been incorporated into the moving image, whether through identification with the camera or through psychological response. Today "interactivity" is the buzzword in the world of art and commerce. This class will consist of a performance lecture during which I will introduce early interactive electronic art as experienced in the work of Nam Jun Paik, and other video artists and filmmakers working the late 60's, 70s early 80's. The viewer becomes interactor, actually manipulating the apparatus itself. We will conclude with a discussion of the assigned readings and on interactive, hands-on experimentation with a closed circuit television setup.

 

Screenings:

Images and text relating to lecture 4:

Part 1: Post Modernism

Part 2: Experimental Film and Video

“Meshes of the Afternoon” Maya Deren (film)
“Fireworks” Kenneth Anger (film)
Cut up Films” William Burroughs (film)
Stan Brakhage “Hand Painted Films” (film)
“Brakhage”, a documentary by Jim Shedden (video)
"Edited For Television" Nam June Paik (video)
“Stamping in the Studio” Bruce Nauman (video)
“TV add” & “Back to You” Chris Burdon (video)
Vertical Roll” Jone Jonas (video)

“Mitchelle’s Death” Linda Montano (video)

“Drift to Dust” Kristine Diekman (video)

“The Passing” Bill Viola (video)
“Incidences of Catastrphy” Gary Hill
(video)
"From the Quotidian: a de_standardized dictionary" Prophet of @

 

Required reading due for discussion:
John Hanhardt, “Paik’s Video Sculpture”. David Ross, “Nam Jun Paik’s Videotapes”. Nam Jun Paik. Whitney Museum of American Art. 1982. 91-110

Prepare for discussion:
--How does Nam Jun Paik's work challenge our assumptions about television? What are the ways he uses and critiques popular culture?

--Brakhage suggests that through art we can have an increased ability to perceive. Imagine your perception unruled by the laws of perspective, logic, socialized vision. Imagine if you had no words for the objects around you, no preconceived models in which to place the things you see. How many colors are in the grass?

Assignment 3: Observation and Hypothetical proposal for a site-specific video installation
Using your oculus, choose a familiar place and look very carefully at this site. What do you see? What kinds of activities are happening or not happening there? Who enters the space, etc. Write a short narrative description about it. After you have described the site, create a hypothetical installation for this site which would include one or more monitors installed at the site. The content of what is seen on the monitors should relate to what happens at that site. For instance, if you chose the front entrance to the library as your site, the images seen on the monitor might include close-ups of pages of books being turned by the wind. You can create this proposal for a hypothetical video installation by creating sketches, still images and writing.
In your proposal indicate how you might subvert the viewer's normal orientation and response to the monitor and images on the monitor. You will turn in your hypothetical proposal at the end of class in two weeks. Be prepared to share your proposals during a brief discussion at the end of class.

Introduction of Assignment 4: "Exquisite Corpse"

In preparation for next week's in-class assignment, I will introduce the Surrealist Parlor Game, the "Exquisite Corpse" and give you a detailed list of what you will need to bring to class. This assignment will take place in class and will address issues brought up in the lecture and the article, such as the mechanisms of recombinant culture, authorship, collaborative creations, appropriation, plagiarism, hypertextuality and alternative narrative structures. You will need to bring to class several pictures (taken by someone else) of the four major parts of the human body (male or female): head, upper torso, lower torso and legs. You will also bring to class fragments of found text on the Internet and will read your fragments of found text as you place the photographs onto the group Exquisite Corpse. I will have a camera set up to record the making of an Exquisite Corpse. This video tape will be edited, compressed and posted on the class webstie.

Week 6
March 1


For Discussion: Before coming to class, research the history of copyright. Please turn in your research to me. Can you explain why the title of today’s reading contains the word "utopian"? What is recombination and how do you experience this in your life? Why do we give such high status to work which is "original"? What are the functions of reproductions in any culture?)

Professor Diekman requests that you bring to class a picture (most likely an advertisement) that is an example of recombinant culture, that is, an example of an artist, designer, photographer who has borrowed images from other artists and used them in their own work. She will also hand out study questions that you will answer in class and hand in at the end of class. I will check these questions to see that you have done the in-class work.

Hypertextuality and the New Narrative
Note: I will follow up Professor Diekman's presentation with key points from my presentation next week.

In this section we will look at recent developments of the moving image in the context of further advances of "telematic culture". We will look closely at the third wave of globalization of visual cutlure brought about by the introduction of the computer, the "Net", the World Wide Web and world wide wireless and satellite telecommunications networks. We will begin with the development of the GUI (Graphical User Interface) in the 1960s and early 70s. We will also look at the early 1980s when Apple introduced the first Graphics-based (windows) computer interface and PC on a mass scale). We will then move to the present with the development of hypertextual, interactive environments within cyberspace. We will also look at the new modes of visuality that have emerged in hypertexts, hypermedia computer environments and cyberspace in general. We will then hold a discussion on the assigned article and cover three important topics related to postmodern cultural production: hypertext or new narrative strategies which are immersive, interactive and nonlinear; the challenge to the notion of plagiarism, authorship and ownership; and finally, the ubiquitous use of appropriation in recombinant culture. We will conclude the class with a hands-on in class experiment in appropriation and recombination by Constructing an "Exquisite Corpse".

 

Related links

History of Virtual Reality
Review of Postmodern tendencies in art and culture: Post Modernism

Screenings:
Images and text relating to lecture #5

Various examples of non linear art, recombinant culture, Net-based art, interactive art

"Hypertextual Consciousness", Mark Amerika
Eastgate and Storyspace

Interactive Cinema Group at MIT

Waxweb, David Blair
Desk Top Theater, Prof Adriene Jenik, UCSD

Digitized Bodies

Webcam at Evergreen Beach, Ephraim, Wis
"{any three letters.com" interactive computer installation, John Bruneau (Quicktime movie)
Adriene Jenick " Mauve Desert" (CD-ROM "translation")
"From the Quotidian" Tony Allard, Herron School of Art, Internet performance and Installation (video)
"Prophet of @" Toni La Bone, Internet performance with CUSeeMe Desktop Teleconferencing Software (Quicktime movie)
Jetsons Meet the Flintstones (Quicktime movie)
Macintosh Commercial (Quicktime movie)

Required reading
: Critical Art Ensemble. "Utopian Plagiarism, Hypertextuality, and Electronic Cultural Production." The Electronic Disturbance. Autonomedia, 1994. 83-101

Discussion: Before coming to class, research the history of copyright. Please turn in your research to me. Can you explain why the title of today’s reading contains the word "utopian"? What is recombination and how do you experience this in your life? Why do we give such high status to work which is "original"? What are the functions of reproductions in any culture?

 

 

Assignment 4: 'Exquisite Corpse"
Note: We will do this assignment at the beginning of class, March 8th. The resulting video will be edited, compressed
and posted on the class website.

Examples of Exquisite Corpses Projects:   Example 1     Example 2   Example 3   Example 4 (text)

This assignment will take place in class and will address issues brought up in the lecture and the article, such as the mechanisms of recombinant culture, authorship, collaborative creations, appropriation, plagiarism, hypertextuality and alternative narrative structures. You will need to bring to class several pictures (taken by someone else) of the four major parts of the human body (male or female): head, upper torso, lower torso and legs. You will also bring to class fragments of found text on the Internet and will read your fragments of found text as you place the photographs onto the group Exquisite Corpse. I will have a camera set up to record the making of an Exquisite Corpse. This video tape will be edited, compressed and posted on the class webstie.

Finished "VSAR 422 Exquisite Corpse" Spring 03
Finished "VSAR 422 Exquisite Corpse" Spring 04

_______________________________________________________________________________________
Part II

The Politics of the Moving Image

 

Week 7

March 8
Colonialism: Privilege of the Gaze

In this class we will discuss the tropes or convention used to observe or represent others, how these act to colonize or objectify. We will also examine the origins of the observer. And finally, we will discuss the phenomenon of the panopticon and we will experience in reality the panopticon as it is expressed in the architecture at the CSUSM campus.


Cinematic Representation and the Gaze

Some theoretical terms you mayt need to know

Screenings
Images and text relating to lecture 6:

Colonial and Post Colonial Gaze
Panopticon

Footage from Television Coverage of the Vietnam War

“Images of an Assasination: A New look at the Zapruder Film" 1996

"Triumph of the Will" 1935, Leni Riefenstahl

"Imagining Indians" 1992, Victor Masayesra

"West Side Story"

"Star Trek the Next Generation"

 

Required reading due for discussion: from The Rhetoric of Empire, "Surveillance, Under Western Eyes", Chpt. 1, pgs. 13-27.

Discussion: What are the tropes or conventions discussed in this reading through which we see or represent other cultures or people? How are the conventions present in your everyday life? What are some of the solutions the authors suggest to break with "objectivist models" of experiencing other cultures and people?

 

Assignment 3 due today at end of class: Hypothetical proposal for a site-specific video installation

Hand in your work at the end of class and be prepared to talk about it during a brief discussion.


Assignment 5: Observations of the panopticon in everyday life

This is a hands-on assignment. Writing, research and observation: During the coming week, note and document instances of the panopticon in your own life, either actually, architecturally or symbolically. Be aware of how the panopticon works as a system of visual control, power or punishment. Also, how does the campus exhibit instances of the panopticon? Have your observations ready for discussion and to turn in next class (two pages). You can use photos, video, web or text to document your observations. You may also use your oculus to frame and reframe your observations.

Introduction to the Panel Presentations

Panel Presentation Schedule

Panel Presentation Guidelines

Panel Presentation Grading Criteria
Panel topics

Examples of Abstracts from Previous Years

 

Week 8

March 15
Signs of Resistance: Cultural Resistance

Using Teshome Gabriel's essay on black cinema, we will entertain the notions of "nomadic aesthetics" and how they are a sign of resistance to mainstream Hollywood film while viewing work from Australian Aboriginal filmmaker, Tracey Moffet, and African documentarian, Cesar Paes. We will also look at the interactive multimedia work by Keith Piper, entitled "Relocating the Remains". In this CD-ROM Piper questions the dominant culture's official history by engaging a "nomadic aesthetic" and proposing a personal, alternative, changeable, non linear history.

 

Screenings:

"Relocating the Remains", Keith Piper  (CD-ROM)

"Angano..Angano..Tales from Madagascar", Cesar Paes, Africa (video)

"Bedevil" Tracy Moffatt, Australia (video)
Related link

"the Virtual Barrio @ the Other Frontier"  by Guillermo Gomez-Pena

Required reading: Teshome H. Gabriel, "Thoughts on Nomadic Aesthetics and Black Independent Cinema: Traces of a Journey." Out There: Marginalization and Contemporary Cultures. MIT Press, 1990. 395-410.

Discussion: What are the characteristics of "nomadic" or "traveling" aesthetics? List its attributes. Merata Mirta has a quote on the bottom of page 401 which suggests that film is "memory pictures." How can you understand the work we will be viewing today in those terms?


Assignment 4 due: 'Exquisite Corpse"

Assignment 5 due: Observations of the panopticon in everyday life
Have panopticon assignment ready for discussion. (See above in week 6)


Week 9

March 22

Introduction to Feminist Film Theory: The Male Gaze
"Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema" is considered a seminal essay in the formation of psychoanalytic and feminist film theory. In this class we will discuss some of the most important ideas embodied in the Mulvey essay and its relation to the preceding topic of objectivist models of representation in post-colonial film theories. However, we will shift our analysis to gendered looking. We will use many of the tropes or conventions Spurr outlined in his essay, "Under Western Eyes", to deconstruct Rear Window.

 

Screening:
terms and concepts on Feminist Film Theory: The Male Gaze

Rear Window, Alfred Hitchcock

Rear Window Study Questions: Please make notes on study questions while watching film in class-hand in next week.

 

Required reading due:

Patricia White. "Feminism and Film". The Oxford Guide to Film Studies. Ed. John Hill and

Pamela Gibson. The Oxford University Press, 1998. 117-134

"Visual Pleasure and Narrative Cinema.", 1975. Screen Magazine, Mulvey, Laura.

Read for writing assignment (see midterm writing assignment): John Berger, Ways of Seeing, Chpt. 3, 45-64

Discussion:How is the gaze "male"? Why does Mulvey use psychoanalysis to understand filmic representation? How does camera technology work to bind us or "suture" us to the image? How does she suggest we disrupt this powerful gaze? How do you find her solutions similar to Spurr in "Under Western Eyes". Please review "Under Western Eyes" for today's class.

Assignment 6: Midterm Writing Assignment
Due in 2 weeks: please see attached or click here for the details of your assignment.

 

Week 10

March 29 - April 4
Spring Break


Week 11

April 5
Signs of Resistance
We will screen the work of activist and filmmaker, Lourdes Portillo and discuss the role of documentary film/video making, particulary in relationship to so called "reality tv" shows. The Documentary form is now, according to San Diego activist and writer, Mike Davis, in a permanent state of crisis and is ineffectual because there is no active political resistance to support the statements made in these documentaries. The effectiveness the documentary form to communicate and speak to a wide audience is further nullified by mainstream media's dominant formula to turn all information into entertainment.


Required reading due:

"Devils and Ghosts, Mothers and Immigrants; A CRITICAL RETROSPECTIVE OF THE WORKS OF LOURDES PORTILLO", Rosa Linda Fregoso,
Lourdes Portillo: The Devil Never Sleeps and Other Films.
 

 

Assignment 6 due: Midterm papers
Turn in papers at the begining of class.


Assignment 7:
Abstracts for panel presentations.

_______________________________________________________________________________________
Part III

Electronic Bodies and the Prosthetics of the new moving image

Week 12

April 12

Computer Animation, Computer Games and Digital Cinema
In this lecture we will examine the recent immergence of computer animation as one of the dominant contemporary means of creating moving images and how this new technology is transforming contemporary visual culture. We will screen works of computer animation and computer games. And finally we will screen “Final Fantasy”, "Tomb Raider" and demo "Tomb Raider", the game. We will discuss the Schneider article and we will also discuss the move in Hollywood towards using virtual actors.  

Related links:

Precursors to contemporary computer animation

Images relating to Lecture 10
Persistance of Vision
Precursors to animation, mechanical moving images

 

Computer animation
History of Animation
A history of computer animation
Anime on TV
Disney

The Meatrix
Sam Chen's Eternal Gaze
VRML

Computer Games
History of Video games
Switch

Computer Games resources
RENDEROSTIY
The Poser Forum Online: www.poserforum.org
3D Alliance: www.3dalliance.net
Brycetech.com: www.brycetech.com
Planet-3D.com: www.planet-3d.com
ZBRUSH: www.pixologic.com
3D Gate: www.3dgate.com

Animation and computer games as Art
Cracking the Mase: switch.sjsu.edu/CrackingtheMaze/
Bitstreams: www.whitney.org
Rhizome: www.rhizome.org
Bit Screen

Game Show: www.massmoca.org/index2.html
SHIFT-CTRL: beallcenter.uci.edu/shift/textonly/main.html
John Haddock'sScreenshots

 

Digital Cinema + Interactive Digital Cinema
"specflic" Professor Adriene Jenik UCSD

"Soft Cinema", Lev Manovich
David Blair (USA). "Wax Web" 1994

Screenings:
"Felix the Cat"
(video clip
)

"Alice" Jan Svenkmeir (video clip)
"Behind the Iris: An exhibition of proto-cnematic sculpture" Gregory Barsamian (video clip)

The late Chuck Jones
Road Runner & Wily Coyote (video)
Osamu Tezuka's Astro Boy

Yelena Aizin's "dCarmen Digital Story Telling" (CD-ROM)

"Final Fantasy"
"Tomb Raider" Laura Croft (game demo, CD-ROM)

"Tomb Raider" the movie (Video clip)
"Synthetic Pleasures", Ira Lee (video Clip)
"The Final Fantasy", Hiranoubu Soggaguchi (Video Clip)

Required reading due:

“Does Lara Croft Wear Fake Polygons? 

Assignment 7: Abstracts for panel presentations due.

Assignment 8: Flip book animation
In the lower right hand corner of your reader make a simple flip book animation. The drawings can be as elaborate as you want to make them. In class we will shoot video of each of the animation and make a compilation of your annotations. This video will be edited, compressed and posted on the class website.
Spring 2003 Finished Flip Book Animations
Spring 2004 Finished Flip Book Animations

 


Week 13

April 19

Virtual Reality, immersive environments; the prosthetics of the new moving image; electronic bodies and the psychology of electronic alter egos.

In this final lecture we will look at the present and future of the moving image, examining recent developments in VR and immersive environments. We will examine recent developments in the human-computer interface and the implications of greater prostheticisation of the body in this process. We will also look at the development in cyberspace of what Sherry Turkle calls the “second self”, the electronic/digital body and the psychology behind these electronic alter egos. We will conclude with a discussion about the future of the moving image.

Required Reading due:
Turkle, Sherry. "Constructions and Reconstructions of the Self in Virtual Reality.", Electronic Culture, Technology and Visual Representation. Ed. Timothy Druckery. Aperture. 354-365.
1)
Cyberspace: History of the Concept
Virtual Worlds (VR)
VR, AR (Augmented Reality) VRML
Examples:

Char Davis "Osmose" and excerpt from video tape
AR (Augmented Reality)
VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language
Example:
VRML example
VRML as Art
http://www.rpi.edu/%7Eruiz/toolbar/StudentWorks_Frameset.html
Immersive environments, a short chronology
Example:

Simulation and Training
Thomas DeFanti, co-developer of the CAVE and director, University of Illinois at Chicago's Electronic Visualization Laboratory.
Related readings on VR and Immersive environments
1945 Vannevar Bush, "As We May Think"
Early Virtual Communitys
Example:

The first on-line bulletin board services (BBS) of the middle 1970s.
CommuniTree
CommuniTree #1 went on-line in May 1978

CommuniTree #2
followed quickly.
SIMNET (1980s --)
Habitat "many-player online virtual environment" (mid 1980s)

Current multi-user online graphical virtual worlds.

Examples:
These are examples of the current trend toward graphical, interactive domains on the internet, sometimes referred to as "habitats," "GMUKS" (Graphical Multi-user Konversation), or, "multimedia chat."
Telegarden

Jaron Lanier, a VR Pioneer, is currently the director of the Internet 2
Tele-Immersion (National Tele-immersion Initiative - NTII)
Internet 2

Examples:
Dive
John Bruneau's "any3letters.com" (Quicktime)
Sheldon Brown Mi Casa Tu Casa

Telegarden
http://www.seemen.org/
Feng Shui of Virtual Environments
Network Communicate Kaleidoscipe
Interactive story links
Lambda Moo

deskswap
Habbohotel
ActiveWorlds

2)
The psychology of Telepresence
Asthetic distance
The second half of this presentation will be done remotely, via streaming technology. I will be located in another part of the campus and will be present in 240 telematically.
Telepresence: the shared “consensual hallucination” precursors to
--The prefix, “tele” means distance, distant. When added as a prefix to the beginning of words it implies the person place or thing that comes to you from a distance through some kind of mediating technology, such as the television
Tele + gram = telegram, or a message sent from a distant place
Tele + vision = television, or vision from afar
Tele + phone = telephone, or sound transmitted from a distance
Tele + presence = telepresence, or presence transmitted from a distance.

The Mind/Body split

Observations on the Psychology of Telepresence
Life on the Screen” Sherry Turkle
A discussion of Sand Stone's article
"Will the Real Body Please Stand Up"

Related articles
The Psychology of Cyberspace
Gender Swithching in Cyberspace
Example:
Synthetic Pleasures, A Virtual Wedding (Video)
Electronic Body building: Agency, Avatars, text, images, sound and hybrid computer interfaces.
Example:
Mark Amerika How To Be a Net Artist
Agency and Agents.

Jaron Lanier Protests Agents
Lanier Protests Development of Agents

Example:
Lainer's Home Page
Example:
Software Agents Group MIT Media Labs
Example:
Tele Immersion Inniciative

Artists approach to the hybrid body:
Roy Ascott has been pushing artificial life art based on self-replicating and evolving software algorithms.
Max More and his group of “Extropians” plot out digitally driven life extension techniques in their battles against entropy.

Stelarc

http://stelarc.va.com.au/
Orlan
http://www.cicv.fr/creation_artistique/online/orlan/

Wim Delvoye's "Cloaca,"
Aaron, the first robot artist, is the brainchild of UCSD Professor Harold Cohen, the British abstract painter.

Harold Cohen and Arron
The future taboo of falling in love with a machine

Example:

Blade Runner
Discussion on the future of the art and technology of the moving image

Assignment 8: Flip book animations due
______________________________________________________________________________
Presentations

Assignment 9: Final Presentations
Panel Presentation Schedule

Panel Presentation Guidelines

Panel Presentation Grading Criteria
Panel topics

Examples of Abstracts from Previous Years


Week 14

April 26

Panel Presentations

 

Week 15

May 3
Panel Presentations

 

Week 16

May 10 (Finals Week)
Panel Presentations